Sunday, July 20, 2014

Conservation of Information

Information must always be available, but it is not necessarily usable. Like energy, information is conserved - it cannot really be lost or created, only changed in form. Entropy really has to do with the energy required to put the bits together into a suitable form for a decision to be made. 

We can account for the costs of information through various means, one one which is the human work hours (or some other unit of time) expended to express and reformulate the mechanisms used to move the bits around. 

Information flowing between domains always causes a loss of usability of some finite fraction of the information, unless sufficient energy input is present to counteract the small-scale distinctions and fine-grained anisomorphisms introduced at the boundaries of the domains. Information content is conserved, but some bits may be masked, mutated, or combined in some manner that is intractable given extant means and methods.  

Relativistic effects also come into play. Two or more highly localized bounded contexts of information necessarily give rise to complex distortions of views between the respective reference frames. Sense making only occurs when one takes into account one's own reference frame and those being observed. 

[I know this is probably bit of BS. It was edited from a brainstorming journal entry originally made 1-2-1997] 
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